Tour the Muckross Traditional Farms map

Quille's Large Farm
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The Crossroads
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The Water Pump
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The Well
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Foley's Medium-Sized Farm
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O'Connor's Labourer's Cottage
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Kissane's Small-Sized Farm
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Farms Reception Building
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The Limekiln

The Schoolhouse
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The Carpenter's Workshop
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The Harness Maker/Saddler
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The Blacksmith's Forge
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Farms Reception
Building

Muckross Traditional Farms reception

This building houses the main information centre for Muckross Traditional Farms, as well as a small shop. Admission tickets to both Muckross Traditional Farms and Muckross House are available here.

Kissane's
Small-Sized Farm

Kissane's Small-Sized Farm

This farm is representative of a holding af about 20 acres, where mixed farming (some dairying and tillage) was practiced. The two-roomed dwelling follows the natural slope of the land and has an outhouse attached at either end. This linear layout was typical of a small farm where fewer outbuildings were required.

The roof of this dwelling would originally have been thatched. Beneath the corrugated iron, a layer of sod under-thatch is visible internally, running from the eaves to the apex of the roof. This formed a layer of insulation and a bed to which the thatch was originally pinned.

O'Connor's Labourer's Cottage

O'Connor's Labourer's Cottage

Throughout much of rural Ireland the word ‘cottage’ was applied exclusively to a dwelling house built for a farm worker. Other dwellings, no matter how humble or small, were never referred to as cottages.

Labourer’s Cottages were erected from the early 1880s onwards and they greatly improved the housing conditions of the landless poor. Usually an acre, or half-acre of land was attached to the cottage, which allowed the labourer to be self-sufficient in potatoes and vegetables.

Foley's Medium-Sized Farm

Foley's Medium-Sized Farm

This farm is typical of a land holding of from 40 to 50 acres, where mixed farming, both tillage and dairying, was practised. The outhouses are built in a row parallel with the rear wall of the dwelling. The space between the dwelling and the outhouses serves as the farmyard. This farmyard layout is found in the north and west of Ireland but is typical of west Munster.

The dwelling is divided into three rooms internally, with the kitchen centrally placed between two bedrooms. Each room occupies the full width of the dwelling and leads directly into the next. There is no connecting hallway or corridor. The thatched roof is steeply pitched to allow the rapid run-off of water.

Quille's Large-Sized Farm

Quille's Large-Sized Farm

This farm represents a large land holding of approximately 100 acres. Aside from dairying, this farmer would have grown grain crops such as wheat, barley and oats. Here the dwelling and outhouses are arranged around a rectangular space, which forms the farmyard. This was the typical farmyard layout for large and medium-sized farms throughout much of Munster, Leinster and parts of east Connaught.

The rooms of this large slate-clad, stone-built, dwelling do not lead directly one into another. Instead, a corridor runs through the main body of the dwelling, ensuring the privacy of the bedrooms. A separate parlour is located at one end of the dwelling. Visitors like the parish priest were entertained here when they came to call, but otherwise this room saw little use.

The Carpenter's Workshop

The Carpenter's Workshop

The carpenter made a range of furniture for the dwelling including dressers, tables, meal bins, chairs, presses, beds and cupboards, knife boxes and saltboxes. He also made barrows, carts and wheels, windows and doors and completed the structural work on the dwelling itself.

The Harness-maker / Saddler

Harness-maker
The harness-maker, or saddler, made and repaired harness, which was used for both horses and donkeys. Saddles and bridles were made for riding horses, while winkers, collars, straddles and breeching, was made for working horses. The skill of the harness-maker almost disappeared with the arrival of motorised transport. However, an increase in the leisure-time activities of carriage driving and horse riding has led to a demand for these skills once more.

The Blacksmith's
Forge

Blacksmith's Forge
The blacksmith was considered one of the most important craftsmen in the community. He made and repaired many items for the farmer including: spades, ploughs, shovels, slanes, forks, sickles, scythes, gates, bolts, hasps and hinges. The forge was a regular meeting place for the men of the locality. There they were brought up to date on the latest news of local interest and of happenings further afield.

The
Schoolhouse

The Schoolhouse
State-sponsored primary school education was introduced to Ireland in 1831 and was organised at parish level. This schoolhouse is typical of many rural Irish schools built from c.1910. Divided into two rooms internally, each teacher usually taught several different classes within the one classroom. Pupils were expected to bring sods of turf to school for the open fires. Separate dry toilets, for boys and girls, were always located in the yard at rear.

The Crossroads

The Crossroads

Crossroads were popular places where people informally met and exchanged the news of the day. If music was available, they often engaged in crossroads dancing. These locations were also frequently the site of the large bonfires, which were lit on 23 June, the eve of the Feast of St John.

The Well

Drawing water from the well for food preparation, washing and all other domestic chores, was part of the daily workload. This ask was usually performed by women and children.

The Water Pump

The Water Pump

The Water Pump was once a familiar feature of the Irish Countryside.

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